Mac mini Early 2006 Explained

Mac mini
Source: apple.com – Mac mini

In 2006, the tech world witnessed a groundbreaking innovation that redefined personal computing – the Apple Mac Mini Early 2006. This compact marvel, part of the esteemed Mac Mini series, emerged as a bridge between desktops and laptops, offering a unique blend of power and portability.

Unveiled on February 28, 2006, the Mac Mini Early 2006 revolutionized performance with the introduction of the Intel Core Duo processor. This upgrade delivered a staggering fourfold increase in speed compared to its predecessors. Priced affordably starting at $599, it opened doors for users to indulge in iLife ’06, an award-winning suite of digital lifestyle applications, all while experiencing seamless navigation through Apple’s innovative Front Row media platform.

Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing, hailed the Mac Mini Early 2006 as a milestone in Apple’s transition to Intel processors. He lauded its enhanced speed, expanded capabilities, and compact design, underscoring its position as the epitome of innovation in personal computing.

The Mac Mini Early 2006 wasn’t just about raw power; it was about elevating the digital lifestyle experience. With Front Row, users could seamlessly enjoy their favorite music, photos, and videos from across the room, thanks to the included Apple Remote. This intuitive interface, coupled with Bonjour networking, facilitated effortless access to shared content throughout the home.

The Mac Mini Early 2006 boasted a revamped system architecture, featuring a 667 MHz front-side bus and expandable DDR2 SDRAM memory up to 2 GB. Moreover, its connectivity options were ahead of its time, with built-in Gigabit Ethernet, AirPort Extreme Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.0+EDR, and a generous array of USB 2.0 ports. This ensured seamless integration with various peripherals and networks.

Mac mini and Cinema Display
Source: apple.com – Mac mini and Cinema Display

Included with the Mac Mini Early 2006 was iLife ’06, a suite of digital tools empowering users to unleash their creativity. From photo editing in iPhoto to video production in iMovie HD, and even website creation with iWeb, the possibilities were endless. These Universal applications optimized performance on the Intel-based Mac Mini, further enhancing user experience.

Powered by Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, the Mac Mini Early 2006 offered unparalleled performance and stability. With essential applications like Safari, Mail, and iChat AV, alongside the innovative Rosetta technology for seamless compatibility with PowerPC applications, it ensured a smooth and productive computing experience.

Despite being discontinued in September 2006, the Mac Mini Early 2006 left an indelible mark on the personal computing landscape. Its compact design, robust performance, and affordability endeared it to users, cementing its status as a beloved relic among Mac enthusiasts. Moreover, it set the stage for subsequent iterations of the Mac Mini, each pushing the boundaries of innovation further.

In retrospect, the Apple Mac Mini Early 2006 was more than just a computer; it was a symbol of innovation and progress. Its legacy lives on in the hearts of users who fondly remember its contributions to personal computing. As we celebrate its 18-year anniversary, let’s commemorate the Mac Mini Early 2006 as a game-changer that paved the way for a new era of computing excellence.

Source: apple.com – Mac mini

Mac mini Early 2006 Details

IntroducedFebruary 28, 2006 – 18 years ago
DiscontinuedSeptember 6, 2006 – 17 years ago
Time on the Market190 days (6 months)
Model IdentifierMacmini1,1
Model NumberA1176
EMC2108
Order NumberMA205LL/A (1.5 GHz)
MA206LL/A (1.66 GHz)
Original Price$599
$799
ColorsAluminum
Weight2.9 Ibs.
1.315 KG
Dimensions2” H x 6.5” W x 6.5” D
5.08 cm H x 16.51 cm W x 16.51 cm D

Mac mini Tech Specs

Processor

ProcessorIntel Core Solo T1200 “Yonah” (1.5 GHz)
Intel Core Duo T2300 “Yonah” (1.66 GHz)
Processor Speed1.5 GHz
1.66 GHz
Architecture32-bit
Number of Cores1
2
System Bus667 MHz
Cache2 MB on-chip L2

Storage & Media

Storage60 GB
80 GB
100 GB
120 GB
Media1 – 12x DVD-ROM/CD-RW “Combo” drive or 4x DVD-R/CD-RW “SuperDrive”

Memory

Built-in Memory512 MB
Maximum Memory2 GB
Memory Slots1 – PC2-5300 200-pin DD1 SO-DIMM 667 MHz
Interleaving SupportYes

Display

Built-in DisplayNone

Graphics

Graphics CardIntel Graphics Media Accelerator GMA950
Graphics Memory64 MB DDR2 shared with main memory*
Display Connection1 – DVI (VGA or S-Video with adapter)
External ResolutionUp to 1920 x 1200 (DVI)
Up to 1920 x 1080 (VGA)
*Memory may vary depending on graphics needs. Minimum memory usage is 80 MB.

Expansion

Expansion SlotsNone
BaysNone
Hard Drive Interface1.5 Gbps Serial ATA (SATA)

Connections

Ethernet10/100/1000BASE-T (RJ-45 – support for jumbo frames)
ModemApple USB Modem MA034Z/A (Optional)
Wi-FiAirPort Extreme Card 802.11b/g
BluetoothBluetooth 2.0 + EDR
ADBNone
USB4 – 480 Mbps (USB 2.0)
SerialNone
SCSINone
FireWire1 – 400 Mbps
Audio In1 – 3.5-mm analog/optical input jack
Audio Out1 – 3.5-mm analog/optical output jack
1 – Built-in speaker
Display1 – DVI (VGA or S-Video with adapter)

Peripherals

PeripheralsApple Remote

Software

Original OSMac OS X 10.4.5
Later OSMac OS X 10.4.6
Maximum OSMac OS X 10.6.8
FirmwareIntel Extensible Firmware Interface
Bundled SoftwareMac OS X 10.4
iLife ’06 (includes iTunes, iPhoto, iMovie HD, iDVD, iWeb, GarageBand)
Microsoft Office 2004 for Mac Test Drive
iWork (30-day trial)
Quicken 2006 for Macintosh
Big Bang Board Games
Comic Life
Omni Outliner
Apple Hardware Test

Power

Backup Battery3 V CR2032 Lithium (922-6476)
Maximum Continuous Power110 W
Line Voltage100 – 240 V AC

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Further Reading and References

Disclaimer: The data presented in this article is under continuous development and has been manually collected from various sources based on their availability. The author of this article may revise this dataset as additional research is conducted and reviewed. Please note that the information is provided “as is” and “as available” without express or implied warranties. The author cannot be held responsible for any omissions, inaccuracies, or errors in the published information. Any warranties relating to this information are hereby disclaimed.