Macintosh Server G3 1999 Macintosh Server G3 1999

Macintosh Server G3 in Blue and White Explained

In the fast-paced world of technology, where innovation is a constant, it’s intriguing to reminisce about the gadgets that paved the way for the sleek devices we use today. One such milestone in Apple’s history takes us back to the year 1999 when the iconic Macintosh Server G3 in Blue and White was released.

Unveiled on January 5, 1999, the Macintosh Server G3 was a pivotal member of the Macintosh Server series, created, manufactured, and sold by Apple. This cutting-edge computer came with a price tag of $3,299, reflecting the technological prowess and premium quality that Apple has always been synonymous with.

Functionally similar to the Power Mac G3 series, the Mac Server G3 models often boasted faster hard drives and were bundled with pre-installed server software. Specifically, the Macintosh Server G3 in Blue and White, featuring a 400 MHz chip, shared its roots with the 400 MHz Power Mac G3 in Blue and White. It came bundled with MacOS 8.5.1 and a pre-installed “AppleShare Solution Kit,” emphasizing its server-oriented capabilities.

Equipped with a robust 350 MHz, 400 MHz, or 450 MHz PowerPC 750 G3 processor, the Macintosh Server G3 was no slouch in terms of performance. The memory configurations included 128 MB or 256 MB of RAM, offering users a decent amount of processing power for the time. Storage options varied with single or dual 9 GB hard drives, complemented by a 32x CD-ROM drive or 5x DVD-ROM. The base model also featured 16 MB ATI Rage 128 GL graphics, ensuring a visually pleasing experience.

Regrettably, the Macintosh Server G3 in Blue and White had a relatively short lifespan, being discontinued on August 31, 1999. Today, it stands as a 25-year-old relic of the past. Despite its brevity in the market, the Macintosh Server G3 left an indelible mark, particularly among tech enthusiasts and Apple aficionados who still fondly remember its unique features and contributions.

The Macintosh Server G3 might be a distant memory for some, but its legacy lives on in the hearts of those who experienced the technological landscape of the late ’90s. It serves as a testament to Apple’s commitment to pushing boundaries and exploring new frontiers in computing. The distinctive blue and white exterior, coupled with its server-centric capabilities, makes the Macintosh Server G3 a standout in Apple’s storied history.

As we reflect on the Macintosh Server G3, we’re reminded of a time when technology was evolving at a pace that seemed unprecedented. This trip down memory lane allows us to appreciate the foundation laid by devices like the Macintosh Server G3, paving the way for the sleek and powerful machines we have today. While the blue and white beauty may have been discontinued, its impact remains, etched in the history of Apple and the hearts of those who were fortunate enough to witness its brief yet significant presence in the world of computing.

Apple Studio 15-inch Display and Power Mac / Mac Server G3
Source: 512pixels.net – Apple Studio 15-inch Display and Power Mac / Mac Server G3

Macintosh Server G3 in Blue and White Details

IntroducedJanuary 5, 1999
DiscontinuedJune 1, 1999 (350 MHz)
August 31, 1999 (400 MHz & 450 MHz)
Model IdentifierPowerMac1,1
Model NumberM5183
Order NumberM6657LL/A (350 MHz)
M6658LL/A (400 MHz)
M7558LL/A (400 MHz)
M7559LL/A (450 MHz)
M7560LL/A (450 MHz)
Original Price$3,299
$4,999
$5,979
ColorsBlue and White
Weight30 Ibs.
13.607 KG
Dimensions17” H x 8.9” W x 18.4” D
43.18 cm H x 22.6 cm W x 46.73 cm D

Macintosh Server G3 1999 Tech Specs

Processor

ProcessorPowerPC 750 G3
Processor Speed350 MHz
400 MHz
450 MHz
Architecture32-bit
Number of Cores1
System Bus100 MHz
Cache32 KB L1
1 MB L2

Storage & Media

StorageUp to three 9 GB 10,000 rpm
Up to three 36 GB 7,200 rpm
Media1 – 24x CD-ROM or 5x DVD-ROM

Memory

Built-in Memory128 MB
256 MB
Maximum Memory1 GB
Memory Slots4 – PC-100 3.3v 168-pin SDRAM
Minimum Speed10 ns
Interleaving SupportNo

Display

Built-in DisplayNone

Graphics

Graphics CardATI Rage 128 GL
Graphics Memory16 MB
Display Connection1 – VGA
Display ModesUnknown

Expansion

Expansion Slots3 – 33 MHz PCI
1 – 66 MHz PCI
Bays4 – Internal 3.5″ ATA drive bays
1 – Optical drive bay
1 – Zip 100 bay
Hard Drive InterfaceUltra2 SCSI
Optical Drive InterfaceEIDE (ATA-3)

Connections

Ethernet1 or 5 – 10/100BASE-T (RJ-45 with 4-port PCI card)
ModemNone
Wi-FiNone
BluetoothNone
ADB1
USB2 – 12 Mbps
SerialNone
SCSIUltra2 SCSI PCI card
FireWire2 – 400 Mbps (15W total power)
Audio In1 – 3.5-mm analog input jack
Audio Out1 – 3.5-mm analog output jack
1 – Built-in speaker
Display1 – VGA

Software

Original OSMac OS 8.5.1 with AppleShare IP 6.2 or Mac OS X Server
Maximum OSMac OS X 10.4.11
FirmwareMac OS ROM

Keyboard and Mouse

PeripheralsApple USB Keyboard
Apple USB Mouse

Power

Backup Battery3.6 V Lithium (922-1262)
Maximum Continuous Power200 W
Line Voltage115 V AC (90-132 V AC) or 230 V AC (180-264 V AC)

Further Reading and References

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Disclaimer: The data presented in this article is under continuous development and has been manually collected from various sources based on their availability. The author of this article may revise this dataset as additional research is conducted and reviewed. Please note that the information is provided “as is” and “as available” without express or implied warranties. The author cannot be held responsible for any omissions, inaccuracies, or errors in the published information. Any warranties relating to this information are hereby disclaimed.

Last updated: January 13, 2024